HANDBOOK

 

(Updated April 2011)            image

Grade 9 – 12

PARENT AND STUDENT HANDBOOK

Home of the Cobras

   

Institut Collegial St. Pierre        

Telephone: (204) 433-7938

Fax:(204) 433-7412

Homepage:  email:  icsp@rrvsd.ca 

 

Dear Parents and Students:

We welcome you to Institut Collégial St. Pierre! ICSP has a long tradition of excellence in academics and citizenship and we strive towards developing our students’ skills in team work, leadership, personal and career development, technology skills, and finally lifelong learning.

Our school is unique in the Red River Valley, as it is the only one to offer both the French Immersion and Technology Education Diplomas. We also have an expansive selection of Career and Work Experience options at ICSP. Almost all of our courses are taught in French, with the exception of English Language Arts, Mathematics and higher level science. In order to reach our goal of developing successful bilingual learners, ICSP boasts an enthusiastic and dedicated team of staff who will always go the extra mile to help students realize their full potential. It is always expected that staff and students will communicate in French.

Our handbook provides a description of the High School Courses, programs and services that are offered at ICSP. The handbook also provides details about policies and beliefs that guide our code of conduct. We offer a variety of courses and programs that respond to the various interests of our students. A combination of these courses will provide a sound and balanced program to our students.

We look forward to meeting the needs of our students as they become members of the ICSP school community. Our counselor, teachers and administrators are here to answer any questions about various courses that are taught at ICSP.

It is our sincere hope that this handbook will assist our students as they prepare for a successful and enjoyable school year and career here at ICSP.

Yours truly,

 

ICSP Principal

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

French Immersion Diploma Requirements…………………………………………….4

Technical Vocation Diploma Requirements……………………………………………5

How to select courses…………………………………………………………………..6

How to Decipher Course Codes………………………………………………………..7

Grade 9 and 10 Optional Course Descriptions…………………………………………8

Grade 11 and 12 Optional Course Descriptions………………………………………..10

Career Course Options…………………………………………………………………13

Private Music Course Options…………………………………………………….……15

A Guide to Mathematics Course Selection…………………………………………….16

Programs that have a Biology, Chemistry or Physics Pre-requisite……………………17

How to select your Grade 12 English Language Arts Course………………………….18

General University Requirements………………………………………………………19

The Semester System, Report Cards, and Exams……..………………………………..20

Course Withdrawal and Summer School………………………………………………21

Counseling and Resource Services..………………………………………………..…22

School Beliefs and Discipline Policy………………………………………………… 24

The Credit System and Graduation Requirements

A student must successfully complete a minimum of 30 credits in order to graduate.

Stream #1: French Immersion Diploma

 

GRADE 9
GRADE 10
GRADE 11
GRADE 12
Compulsory Credits(6)
Compulsory Credits(6)
Compulsory Credits(5)
Compulsory Credits (4)
Français                                  1
English                                   1
Mathematics                  1
Social Studies                         1
Science                                  1
Phys. Ed.                                1
Français                                 1
English                                   1
Mathematics                  1
(One of Essential Mathematics, or Introduction to Applied and Pre-Calculus Mathematics)
Geography                    1
Science                                  1
Phys. Ed.                               1
Français                                 1
English                                   1
Mathematics               1
(One of Consumer, Applied, or Pre-Calculus Mathematics)
History                                    1
Phys. Ed.                                1
Français                             1
English                              1
(One of Comprehensive, Transactional, or Literary Focus)
Mathematics              1
(One of Consumer, Applied, or Pre-Calculus Mathematics)
Phys. Ed.                           1
Options (3)
Options (3)
Options (2)
Options (2)
Computer Science
Band
Multimedia
Art
Drama
Family Studies
Leadership
Spanish
Outdoor Education
Career Development
Skills for Independent Living
  Computer Science
Band
Multimedia
Art
Drama
Family Studies
Leadership
Spanish
Outdoor Education
Career Development
Skills for Independent Living
    Physics
Chemistry
Biology
Leadership
Law
Psychology
Career Development
Art
Drama
Family Studies
Band
History
Physics
Chemistry
Biology
Leadership
History
Law
Psychology
Career Development
Family Studies
Band
English Lit. or Trans.
9 credits
(min. 4 taught in French)
9 credits
(min. 4 credits taught in French)
 
7 credits (min.)
(min. 3 credits taught in French)
5 credits (min.)
(min. 3 credits taught in French)

 

Out-of-class Options: Community Service, Co-op Education, Tutoring, Internship, Apprenticeship (see career course options on p. 13) Cultural Exploration, Independent Music Option see  p. 15),, Royal Ballet Credit (Special Language Option.)

 

Correspondence Courses: Retailing, Start Your Own Business, Keyboarding, Digital Pictures, Accounting, Drafting and Design, German, Home Economics, Art, Electricity and Electronics, and Agriculture. (See counselor for more info)

 

Stream #2: Technical Vocational Diploma

 

GRADE 9 GRADE 10 GRADE 11 GRADE 12
Compulsory Credits (6) Compulsory Credits(5) Compulsory Credits (3) Compulsory Credits (3)
Français                                  1

English                                   1

Mathematics                  1

Social Studies                         1

Science                                  1

Phys. Ed.                                1

English                                   1

Mathematics                  1

(One of Consumer, Applied, or Pre-Calculus Mathematics)

Geography                    1

Science                                  1

Phys. Ed.                               1

English                              1

Mathematics                  1

(One of Consumer, Applied, or Pre-Calculus Mathematics)

Phys. Ed.                                1

English                              1

(One of Comprehensive, Transactional, or Literary Focus)

Mathematics              1

(One of Consumer, Applied, or Pre-Calculus Mathematics)

Phys. Ed.                           1

 

Options (3) Option (2) Options (4) Options (4)
Computer Science

Band

Multimedia

Art

Drama

Family Studies

Skills for Independent Living

Leadership

Spanish

Outdoor Education

 

Career Development

Computer Science

Band

Multimedia

Art

Drama

Family Studies

Skills for Independent Living

Leadership

Spanish

Outdoor Education

Career Development

*Introduction to Trades and Technology  (4 credits)

*recommended

Agriculture and Biotechnology

Auto Body Repair

Automotive Technology – RVS

Automotive Technology – GVC

Building Construction

Community Health & Child Care ( Health Care Aid or Para Educator )

Cosmetology

Culinary Arts

Diesel Mechanics

Industrial Welding

Manufacturing Technology

 

Agriculture and Biotechnology

Auto Body Repair

Automotive Technology – RVS

Automotive Technology – GVC

Building Construction

Community Health & Child Care ( Health Care Aid or Para Educator )

Cosmetology

Culinary Arts

Diesel Mechanics

Industrial Welding

Manufacturing Technology

 

9 credits

 

7 credits (min)

 

 

(min. 4 from one of the clusters above)

7 credits

(min. 4 from one of the clusters above)

7 credits

       

 

*In order to qualify for the Technical Vocational Diploma students are required to take a minimum of 8 vocational courses from one single cluster (i.e. Diesel Mechanics). Students from the French Immersion stream are; however, welcome to take vocational courses to fulfill their options requirements.

** Students may also complete 8 Apprenticeship credits and qualify for a Technical Vocational Diploma. (See Career Options on page 13)

*** For more information on the each of the Vocational programs and their locations please visit www.rrtva.ca

What to Consider When Selecting Courses

As a student, you must take responsibility of choosing very seriously. You are encouraged to get all the information you can before making course choices. You should consult with your parents, school counselor and teachers when selecting your courses.

 

Ask yourself:

What are my interests?

What are my abilities?

What career do I have in mind?

What courses do I need in order to achieve my career goals?

 

How to Decipher Course Codes

CREDITS

The credit system begins in Grade 9 in all Manitoba High Schools. All courses offered are 1 credit each, any exceptions are specified. The minimum credits required for a Manitoba High School Diploma is 30.

COURSES NUMBERING

The numbering system is made up of three parts, the first and second being numbers and the third a letter. The first number represents the grade level, the second number of credits to be obtained in the course and who wrote the course (the school or the Department of Education), and the third the level of difficulty or specialization.

FIRST NUMBER

1 = Grade 9

2 = Grade 10

3 = Grade 11

4 = Grade 12

SECOND NUMBER

0 – Developed/approved by Manitoba Education, Citizenship and Youth for 1 or more credits

5 – Developed/approved by Manitoba Education, Citizenship and Youth for ½ credit

1 – Developed by the School or Division including Self Initiated Projects for ½ or more credits

2 – Advanced placement courses or private music options.

LETTER

F Foundation: educational experiences, which are broadly based and appropriate to all students.

G General: general educational experience for all students.

S Specialized: learning experiences/skills leading to further studies at the post-secondary level.

M Modified: courses for which curriculum has been modified to take into account the capabilities of students with special needs.

EXAMPLES

Social Studies 10G – Grade 9, general course, developed by the Department for 1 credit.

Pre Calculus 20S – Grade 10, specialized course developed by Manitoba Education, leading to further studies at the post-secondary level.

Tutoring 31G – Grade 11, general course, developed by the school.

 

Optional Courses

Grades 9 and 10

ART 10G, 20G

The Senior Art program is intended to develop visual, tactile, and auditory

perception and skills. The students will be exposed to various forms of art and techniques. Technical skills include exercises that deal with such media as pencil, pen and ink, colored pencil, paints, pastels and clay handling.

 

BAND 10G, 20G,

Prerequisite: Grade 8 Band or permission of instructor.

This course is designed to develop each musician’s musical skills. The course will include both instrumental and theory instruction with the primary focus being performance. Concerts will highlight some of the works studied throughout the year.

 

Special Note: Students are expected to participate in all concerts and activities. Home practice is expected. Students should note that the Grade 12 Music Band credit is considered a University Entrance Credit

LEADERSHIP 31G      A full credit course in Leadership 31G has four main objectives:

  1. To develop student leadership through initiation and implementation of various awareness, spirit, and community service projects.
  2. To perform administrative tasks related to the planning and organization of intramural sport activities and special events (e.g. special days and excursions).
  3. To share responsibility for the running of the school’s canteen.
  4. To experience a personal commitment and responsibility to school events, global and local community issues and school and community spirit.

 

SPANISH 10F

This beginner’s course in Spanish is based on the language skills: oral comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. The conversational aspect is highly encouraged so students may learn to communicate as well as possible and as soon as possible. Students will be exposed to American and European Spanish, although emphasis is on the former, and introduced to Hispanic art, music and culture.

FAMILY STUDIES 10G, 20G

Family Studies addresses many of the issues faced by adolescents in this transitional stage of their lives. Topics include:

 

·                  Self-concept and Personal Goals

·                  Personal Development and Mental Health

·                  Dealing with Emotions

·                   Conflict Management

·                  Healthy Lifestyle choices

·                  Healthy Friendships and Relationships

·                  Sexuality and Safe Sex Practices

·                  Healthy Pregnancy, Fetal Development and Parenting

 

DRAMA 10G, 20G

 

Theatre and drama is a wonderful course for improving second-language skills as well as teamwork skills. During the course, students will learn various techniques in body movement, voice articulation, and memorization skills while working on monologues, dialogues, improvisation and an original production. Students in this course will participate annually in the Festival Theatre Jeunesse.

 

COMPUTER SCIENCE  (INFORMATIQUES) 20S

 

Computer science will develop a student’s understanding of the functioning of computer hardware; will familiarize students with a variety of operating systems. Students will create original projects (ie. animation) using a variety of software programs.

 

MULTIMEDIA (INFORMATIQUES) 40S

 

Students in this course will create an array of individual and group projects such as commercials, power point presentations, photo editing and filming projects, website development, etc. Students will become skilled in using a variety of software programs and media equipment.

 

OUTDOOR EDUCATION 21G

 

Outdoor Education involves teaching students the skills necessary for outdoor survival. Topics include: essential tools and knowledge, using maps, orienteering, first aid, shelter, climate and land, food, and finally disaster and survival. Students in this course will practice their learning hands-on in a variety of outdoor excursions.

SKILLS FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING 21G

This course emphasizes the knowledge, skills, and behavior essential to a productive future in a changing world. Key topics include communication skills, organizational skills, self-exploration, decision making, goal setting, intrapersonal skills and the world of work.

Optional Courses

Grades 11 and 12

LAW (DROIT) 40S  

The Law 40S course is an introduction to our Canadian Legal system. It is designed to enable the student to discover his/her relationship to law, his/her legal rights and obligations and how law affects him/her now and in the future.

Topics to be studied include:

·                  Origins of law

·                  The Common Law & its origins

·                  The Civil Law & its origins

·                  The Canadian Legislative system Canadian Constitution

 

·                  Canadian Charter of   Rights &  Freedoms

·                  Canadian judicial system

·                  Criminal law

  • The judicial procedure

BAND 30S, 40S

Prerequisite: Grade 10 Band or permission of the instructor.

This course is designed to refine and advance each musician’s musical skills. The course will include both instrumental and theory instruction with the primary focus being performance Concerts will highlight some of the works studied throughout the year.

 

Special Note: Students are expected to participate in all concerts and activities. Home practice is expected. Students should note that the Grade 12 Music Band credit is considered a University Entrance Credit

LEADERSHIP 31G  A full credit course in Leadership 31G has four main objectives:

  1. To develop student leadership through initiation and implementation of various awareness, spirit, and community service projects.
  2. To perform administrative tasks related to the planning and organization of intramural sport activities and special events (e.g. special days and excursions).
    1. To share responsibility for the running of the school’s canteen.
    2. To experience a personal commitment and responsibility to school events, global and local community issues and school and community spirit.

MULTIMEDIA (INFORMATIQUES) 40S

Students in this course will create an array of individual and group projects such as commercials, PowerPoint presentations, photo editing and filming projects, website development, etc. Students will become skilled in using a variety of software programs and media equipment.

PSYCHOLOGY 40S

 

Psychology course is the study of human behavior. Topics to be included are normal and abnormal behavior, personality development and disorders, sleep, dreams and the unconscious, human motivation, perception, social psychology, learning, and intelligence,.

FAMILY STUDIES 40S

The purpose of this course is to help students understand themselves and their family situations, to help them appreciate the variety and diversity among families today, and to help make them more conscious of the personal decisions that one must make throughout life and of the societal influences that affect those decisions. The units include development, personal development, relationships and life choices, parenthood, diversity in families and aging.

BIOLOGY 30S

Prerequisite: Science 20F

The Biology 30S course encompasses on one hand an introduction to the life sciences and on the other, an overview of human anatomy and physiology. The first part of the course includes the study of biological characteristics, a presentation of cell theory, and an introduction to biochemistry. The bulk of the course entails a relatively detailed study of the human body. The human systems are examined from an anatomical, physiological and pathological viewpoint.

BIOLOGY 40S

Several themes are studied in Biology 40S. Cellular reproduction is examined in detail. Nucleic acid replication and protein synthesis are also studied in the first part of the course. Genetics, that is, the study of the transmission of character traits, is an important part of the course. Also included is the study of the five biological kingdoms (Monera, Protista, Fungi, Plantae and Animalia). The evolutionary mechanisms of species and variation are also considered.

CHEMISTRY 30S

Prerequisite: Science 20F. A strong background in Mathematics is recommended.

The course covers topics such as:

  • atomic and molecular theory
  • mole concept
  • formulae and chemical equations
  • behaviors, both qualitative and quantitative, of gasses, liquids and solids
  • introduction into organic chemistry

Note: There is a heavy emphasis on the quantitative i.e. mathematical aspects of Chemistry.

CHEMISTRY 40S

Prerequisite: Chemistry 30S. A strong background in Mathematics is recommended.

The Chemistry 40S course will consist of 9 units or chapters. The purpose of

Chemistry 40S is an extension or continuation of the purpose of Chemistry 30S – that of developing some basic principles of chemistry through experimentation, textbook study and problem solving.

The fundamental principles which will be introduced to the student at the Chemistry 40S level will include: solubility equilibria, acid and base systems, oxidation reduction reactions, atomic structure, atomic bonding, and molecular architecture.

HISTORY 40S

This contemporary history course covers the period from 1914 to the present and includes in-depth coverage of such events as the first and second world wars, the cold war, the breakup of the communist bloc and the recent manifestations of nationalism in Europe and elsewhere.

PHYSICS 30S   

Prerequisite: Science 20F.The study of the motion of objects and the related concepts of force and energy forms the field called mechanics. The study of waves, sound waves in particular, and their motion are also explored – the focus of Physics 30S. Mechanics is divided into two parts:

  • kinematics – the description of how objects move, and
  • dynamics, which deals with why objects move as they do.

Note: Students must be enrolled in Math pre-calculus 30S or Applied Math 30S.

PHYSICS 40S

Prerequisite: Physics 30S

A further study of kinematics and dynamics of motion are the nature of the first part

of the course. Topics studied are projectile motion in two dimensions, momentum, kinetic and gravitational potential energy and circular motion.

The study of fields: gravitational, electrical and magnetic are also explored. These topics are then applied to concepts of space exploration, low earth orbits and electromagnetic induction and medical physics. The study of electricity and electric circuits are also included in the course.

Career Course Options

COMMUNITY SERVICE  31G, 41G

In this course, students will have the opportunity to volunteer their time to an organization, club, institution, or workplace of their choice. The work hours must be to the benefit of the community and/or its residents. The students will complete a 110 hour practicum. The progress will be monitored through the use of journal writing/reflecting on the work experiences. Students may not be remunerated for their work. It should be strictly volunteer work.

 

CO-OP EDUCATION 21G

This course allows the students to obtain knowledge and understanding of the workforce through hands-on experience in a workplace of choice. The purpose of the course is to assist students in making a successful transition from high school to the workplace, to develop a pathway towards a career or a trade, to develop technical literacy skills, good communication skills, and to develop a positive work ethic, respect for punctuality, and a sense of responsibility. The student will complete a practicum of 110 hours. The student’s progress will be monitored through the use of journal writing and reflection on the work experiences. The student cannot accept remuneration for the hours worked.

CAREER DEVELOPMENT 10S, 20S, 30S, 40S

The career development program has been designed to connect school learning with workplace and labor market realities. This course will provide a smoother transition between high school graduation and more appropriate post-secondary programs that are required in today’s economy. The experiential learning components will provide students with opportunities to explore potential occupations. Students will spend varying amounts of time developing individualized career portfolios – depending on course grade level.
INTERNSHIP 40S

The Career Internship Program will provide students with an excellent opportunity to practice and develop employability skills while exploring various careers and workplaces. Students will spend 75 hours in their work placement, and will complete a course book component for each credit earned, that best suit their specific placement or interests. The work schedule is determined by the student and the employer/supervisor. The school coordinator will make worksite visits at varying points throughout the practicum.

Note: A student may apply up to 12 full credits of internship towards their graduation.

 

SENIOR YEARS APPRENTICESHIP OPTION

The SYOA provides students with the opportunity to gain work experience in a chosen trade, receive payment, and earn high school credits at the same time. To qualify, students must be 16 years or older, must be taking core subjects in school, and must have completed Grade 10. Students must work as an apprentice for 110 hours in order to earn 1 full high school credit. After graduation, students may then apply their on-the-job training hours to continued, full-time apprenticeship training.

For more information please visit SYOA website:  www. gov.mb.ca/tce/apprent/future/syao.html or visit the school coordinator.

TUTORING 31G

This course offers students the chance to get first hand experience with tutoring. Students will learn about child development and factors that influence the learning process. The student may work one-on-one with a younger student, with a small group, or even as a coach. Students will spend 75 hours tutoring and 35 hours doing course readings, assignments, and journal entries

PRIVATE MUSIC CREDIT OPTION

Private Music Option

The Private Music Option, in which credit is offered for studies under private teachers, may be offered for credit in Senior I and in each year of the high school. The requirements for this option have been set up by the universities and departments of education of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, acting through the Western Board of Music. Where private teachers of music are available, it is recommended that principals and teachers draw students’ attention to this provision for training in music. Please refer to the credit criteria on the following page

. Alternative Credit Options

Private Music Option 12G Western Board of Music Royal Conservatory of Toronto
Theory (Grade 1) – plus ONE of: Grade 1: String Bass, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Horn, Trumpet, Trombone, Euphonium, Percussion

Grade 2: Recorder

Grade 5: Singing, Piano, Violin, Viola, Cello

Preliminary Rudiments plus ONE of:

Grade 2: Singing, Bassoon, Clarinet, Flute, Oboe, Saxophone, French Horn, Trombone, Euphonium, Trumpet, Tuba, Percussion

Grade 5: Piano, Violin, Accordion, Guitar

Private Music Option 22G Theory (Grade II) plus ONE of:

Grade 3: String Bass, Recorder, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Horn, Trumpet, Trombone, Euphonium, Percussion

Grade 6: Singing, Piano, Violin, Viola, Cello, Guitar

Grade 7: Organ

Theory (Grade 1) plus ONE of:

Grade 4: Singing, Bassoon, Clarinet, Flute, Oboe, Saxophone, French Horn, Trombone, Euphonium, Trumpet, Tuba, Percussion Grade 6: Piano, Violin, Accordion, Guitar

Private Music Option 32S Theory (Grade III) – plus ONE of:

Grade 5: String Bass, Recorder, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Horn, Trumpet, Trombone, Euphonium, Percussion

Grade 7: Piano, Violin, Viola, Cello, Guitar, Singing

Grade 8: Organ

Theory (Grade II) plus ONE of:

Grade 6: Singing, Cello, Bassoon, Clarinet, Flute, Oboe, Saxophone, French Horn, Tuba,

Trombone, Euphonium, Trumpet, Percussion Grade 7: Piano, Violin, Accordion, Organ, Guitar

Music Option 42S Theory (Grade IV) plus ONE of:

Grade 7: String Bass, Recorder, Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Horn, Trumpet, Trombone, Euphonium, Percussion

Grade 8: Singing, Piano, Violin, Viola, Cello, Guitar

Grade 9: Organ

Theory (Grade II) if not previously passed plus ONE of:

Grade 8: Singing, Organ, Cello, Piano, Violin, Accordion, Guitar, Bassoon, Clarinet, Flute, Oboe, Saxophone, Tuba, French Horn, Trombone Euphonium, Trumpet, Percussion

 

Note: The above requirements are subject to change each year.

 

A GUIDE TO MATHEMATICS COURSE SELECTION

In Grade 10, students may choose from two different mathematics courses, each one counts as a course credit towards graduation and each course offers post-secondary educational options. These courses have been designed to meet different interests and learning needs of students.

When students choose courses which best suit their needs, they have the greatest chance                        for success and they develop a mathematical foundation that can be built upon in the future.

 

University Programs that require Pre-Cal 40S (with a minimum of 60%)

Medicine

Pre-Veterinary Medicine

Agriculture and Food Sciences

Business

Engineering

Environmental Science

Geology

Geophysics/Physical Geography

Pharmacy

Optometry

Commerce

 

University Programs that require Pre-Cal 40S OR Applied Math 40S

Computer Science

Management

Biology

Biopsychology

Business

Chemistry

Economics

Environmental Studies

Health and Fitness Studies

Psychiatric Nursing

Statistics

Mathematics

Physics

Journalism

Red River College Programs that require Pre-Cal 40S

 

Aviation Management

Health Information Management (strongly recommended)

Network Technology

Electronic and Network Technician

Mechanical Engineering

Chemical and Biosciences Technology

Medical Lab Sciences

Radiation Therapy

 

Please note: If you begin in Pre-cal and wish to switch to Applied Math or Consumer Math in the following years, you may do so. YOU MAY NOT take Consumer Math in Grade 10, and then move to Pre-Calculus in the following grades.

 

*** Further, to qualify for University Scholarships you need 5 40S credits from a specific list. Pre-Cal counts as one of these credits, whereas Consumer Math does not. Therefore, if you choose to take Consumer Math 40S in Grade 12, you will also need to take an extra 40S credit to meet those requirements.

 

Programs that will have a Biology 40S, Pre-Cal 40S, Chemistry 40S and Physics 40S prerequisite

Under the current degree course requirements, the following programs will require students to have a Biology 40S credit in addition to a Pre-Cal 40S credit and ONE OF either Chemistry 40S or Physics 40S.

  • Agricultural & Food Sciences (all majors)
  • Dentistry
  • Faculty of Environment, Earth & Resources (Environmental Sciences only)
  • Education (if teachable area requires Biology)
  • Health Sciences
  • Textile Development
  • Exercise & Sport Science
  • Microbiological Sciences Option
  • Medicine
  • Pharmacy
  • Science (all Biological Sciences)
  • Agricultural & Food Sciences (Agribusiness)
  • Human Ecology (Health Studies)

 

HOW TO SELECT YOUR ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS COURSE

The prerequisite for all Grade 12 English options is successful completion of English 30S.

The following is a brief summary of the difference between the terms transactional and literary.

Literary material is language – written, spoken, read, or visual – that has a literary, usually fictional spin on it. That means rather than studying a book on business, the student reads a novel, and rather than writing a report, the student writes a short story.

Transactional is the language of getting things done. It is practical, functional and direct. Transactional material is usually non-fiction, contemporary, and useful in day to day living. Students will read about someone rather than read the author’s fiction. Scientific writing is more likely to be read than poetry. Acting out a play is literary, while writing the essay is transactional.

 

Note: Students may choose to register for two English 40S courses. Students may enroll in Transactional AND Literary if they wish.

 

** Special Note: Regardless of English course choice, all Grade 12 students must write the Grade 12 ELA Provincial Exam which counts for 30% of the final mark.

 

General University Requirements

In Manitoba, universities require a minimum of 5 40-level (Grade 12) courses with an average of 70% across 3 of those: English 40S, Math 40S and one other 40S subject (with a min. 60% in English 40S)

 

For scholarship consideration, students must have a minimum of 80% average across 5 approved 40S courses from the following list:

 

List of Approved Grade 12 Courses
Accounting Systems 40S Filipino 40S Mathematics:
Anglais 40S Français 40S Applied Mathematics 40S or
Art 40S French 40S Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S
Biology 40S German 40S Music 40S (One of Band, Choral,
Chemistry 40S Hebrew 40S Guitar, Strings, Private Music
Chinese (Cantonese) 41G History 40S Option)
Chinese (Mandarin) 40S Physics 40S
ComputerScience 40S Geography 40S Polish 40S
Cree/Ojibway 41G Italian 40S Portuguese 40S
Dramatic Arts 40S Japanese 40S Spanish 40S
Economics 40S Latin 40S Ukrainian 40S
English 40(2 credits) Law 40S World Issues 40S
Family Studies 40S

 

General School Information

The Semester System

The ICSP school year is divided into two equal parts or semesters. The first semester extends from beginning of the school year in September to approximately the end of January. The second semester extends from February until the end of June. Most one credit courses are scheduled to meet six periods per week and last one semester. However, some one credit courses (usually optional courses) meet only three or four periods per week and run all year long.

Evaluation

Students will be evaluated both formatively and summatively throughout the year. Formative assessment is used to assist the learning process and to guide teaching and learning. These evaluations do not usually count towards the final mark. Examples of formative assessments may include ungraded quizzes, oral questioning, teacher observations, draft work, class discussion, and portfolios. Summative evaluation includes things that aid in determining the final mark such as tests, projects, and presentations.

All teachers will distribute a course outline at the beginning of the year that will provide a more specific definition of the evaluation used in each course. Most Grade 9 to 12 courses include a final exam that represents 20 to 30 percent of the final grade. The final exams for courses ending in the first semester are usually scheduled at the end of January and the exams for courses ending in June are usually scheduled during the second last week of June.

Some courses offer exemptions from exams. Teachers will inform students of the possibility of exemption at the beginning of the year or semester.

Note: We strongly recommend that parents do not schedule family vacations or appointments for their son/daughter during the formal exam periods.

 

Report Cards and Communication Regarding Student Progress

Students will receive report cards 4 times per year – November, February, April, and June.

  1. Parent-teacher conferences will be held in conjunction with the November and April report cards.
  2. Teachers will contact parents by phone, e-mail, or by progress report if their son/ daughter are experiencing major difficulties.
  3. Parents may contact the school or a specific teacher by phone or e-mail at any time to inquire about the son’s/daughter’s progress. For a list of teachers and their e-mail address, please visit the staff section of our website at: icsp.rrvsd.ca

Promotion

Students in Grade 9 to Grade 12 are promoted by subject. Any student who fails a course will not receive the credit for that course and will have to repeat it in its entirety.

Summer School

During the months of May and June, information from Summer School programs is sent to all High Schools. Students who may wish to attend a Summer School Program should speak to the counselor during that time. The cost for Summer School is the student’s/ parent’s responsibility.

Withdrawing from a Course

If a student wishes to withdraw from a course, he/she should follow this procedure:

  • discussion with the teacher and the guidance counselor;
  • complete timetable change form at guidance office
  • obtain parental approval and administration approval
  • submit form to the office

Our school counseling services are available to respond to the personal, social, educational, and career development of all students of ICSP. Students can choose to see the counselor on their own, or they may be referred by parents, teachers and administrators. Students can be assured that problems or personal concerns will be discussed in a caring and confidential atmosphere

STUDENT SERVICES

Counseling Services at ICSP

Students can expect the following services from the school counselor:

  • Educational planning

The counselor will assist students in areas of course selection and changes, secondary school alternatives,

and post-secondary planning.

  • Career exploration

Students can explore future job/career possibilities and/or training with the counselor.

  • Personal counseling

Students can be assured that problems or personal concerns will be discussed in a caring and confidential atmosphere. Student Services also has access to many Divisional resources that a student may need such as psychology, social work, and speech and language therapy, as well as external resources such as psychiatry, mental health, and Occupational Therapy.

 

The Learning Centre

The Learning Centre in the Resource Department at ICSP provides a comfortable learning environment for any student needing additional academic support with their regular classroom work, as well as with Distance Learning courses. The learning centre is equipped with computers, resource books, and a teacher’s assistant who is available to assist students with their work.

 

 

Resource Services

 

Our resource program aims to provide support to classroom teachers in helping students develop in all areas: social, emotional, physical and intellectual.

The role of the resource teacher is as follows:

  • assisting the classroom teacher in identifying and assessing at-risk students;
  • consulting and collaborating with classroom teachers in setting up individualized programming to meet student needs;
  • assisting teachers in selecting strategies and instructional materials;
  • collaborating with classroom teachers in reviewing and redefining individualized, adapted and modified programs;
  • collaborating with the student services team and the classroom teachers in informing parents of the results of assessment and the special programming needs of their child.
  • coordinating educational assistants

 

ICSP Discipline Plan:

 

Based on feedback from parents and students and consequent school-wide staff workshops, ICSP has modified the Discipline Policies.  The new system is based on integration of Restitution and past common practices.  Restitution is a system that helps create the conditions for the person to fix their mistakes and return to the group strengthened.

ICSP Beliefs:

Everyone has the right to dignity and respect.

Everyone has the right to learn in a safe environment.

Everyone should always strive to do their best

Bottom lines:

Damage to other people’s property is never acceptable

Threats and/or bullying in any form (verbal, physical or implied) is never acceptable

Violence in any form is never acceptable

Drug / Alcohol use and/or possession is never acceptable

Inappropriate language especially directed at a person is never acceptable

Inappropriate Internet use and computer / handheld related abuse is never acceptable

 

Interventions, consequences and Restitution at the School Level

(Divisional Policies may add to the consequences)

 

Mistake Intervention Restitution
Damage to other people’s property Interview to determine who was responsible.

Meet with Admin / Counseling to determine need for damaging property

 

Fix /replace or pay for repairs

Provide restitution for the victims in the form of apology or agreement to not repeat damage

Consequence:

If restitution does not fix mistake, .5 day in school suspension to a maximum of 5 days out of school suspension

** Divisional Policy may add to this maximum**

Bottom Line: Damage to other people’s property is never acceptable at ICSP

 

Mistake Intervention Restitution
Threats

(verbal,

physical

or implied)

Staff (or students) will bring to attention of Administration (writing)

Students will be interviewed

Parents will be informed

A threat assessment file will be created / or modified

Superintendent will be informed (out of school suspension)

Meet with Counselor and/or Administration to resolve conflict and arrange restitution for the victim (s)

Create a plan to prevent future threats from occurring

Consequence:

If restitution does not fix mistake, minimum .5 day in school suspension to a maximum of 5 days out of school suspension

** Divisional Policy may add to this maximum**

Bottom Line: Threats are never acceptable at ICSP

 

Mistake Intervention Restitution
Bullying:

Repeated threats

(verbal,

physical

or implied)

Staff and students will bring to attention of Administration (writing)

Students will be interviewed

Parents will be informed

A threat assessment file will be created / or modified

RCMP may be involved

Meet with Counselor and/or Administration to resolve conflict

Arrange restitution for the victim (s)

Create a plan to prevent future bullying from occurring

Consequence:

Minimum .5 day in school suspension to a maximum of 5 days out of school suspension

** Divisional Policy may add to this maximum**

Bottom Line: Bullying is never acceptable at ICSP

 

Mistake Intervention Restitution
Violence:

Intent to injure, fighting, weapons

Staff and students will bring to attention of Administration (writing)

Students will be interviewed

Parents will be informed

Superintendent will be informed (out of school suspension)

A threat assessment file will be created / or modified

RCMP may be involved (injure, fight)

RCMP will be involved in the case of weapons.

Meet with Counselor and/or Administration to resolve conflict

Arrange restitution for the victim (s)

Create a plan to prevent future violence from occurring

Consequence:

Minimum .5 day in school suspension to a maximum of 5 days out of school suspension

** Divisional Policy may add to this maximum**

Bottom Line: Violence is never acceptable at ICSP

 

Mistake Intervention Restitution
Drug / Alcohol Use / Possession:

 

Staff and students will bring to attention of Administration (writing)

Students will be interviewed

Searches will be conducted as per outlined by the Schools Act

Parents will be informed

Superintendent will be informed

A threat assessment file will be created / or modified

RCMP will be involved if reasonable proof is available.

Meet with Counselor and/or Administration to determine needs (Social Work, Addictions Foundation, Professional Counseling)

 

Create a plan to prevent future use/possession from occurring

Consequence:

If suspicion, minimum 1 day in-school suspension

If proof, minimum 3 day out of school suspension

If recurring offense, minimum of 3 week to a maximum of 5 week out of school suspension

** Divisional Policy may add to this maximum**

Bottom Line: Alcohol and Drug use / possession is never acceptable at ICSP

 

Mistake Intervention Restitution
Inappropriate Internet computer / handheld related abuse Staff and students will bring to attention of Administration (writing)

Students will be interviewed

Parents will be informed

A threat assessment file will be created / or modified if deemed a threat

RCMP may be involved

 

Meet with Counselor and/or Administration to determine extent of mistake

 

Arrange restitution for the victim (s)

 

Create a plan to prevent future inappropriate use of internet, computers and handhelds

Consequence:

Internet, computer and handheld privileges will be removed for a minimum of a week to a maximum of a year.

If restitution does not fix mistake, .5 day in school suspension to a maximum of 5 days out of school suspension

** Divisional Policy may add to this maximum**

Bottom Line:

Inappropriate use of internet, computers and handhelds is never acceptable at ICSP